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Backcountry Coalition
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Technical Gear Repair
Posted: 31 March 2012 10:08 AM   [ Ignore ]
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There are a few options on how to repair gear that is often used in the backcountry.  Most commonly, people put extra venting in their apparel and need to resolve that situation when they realize that the open vents do not bode well on those really cold and snowy days.

There are 4 easy steps to this process:

step 1: Locate the vent. you will likely notice it because you are cold, heard a ripping sound, have a stick poking out, or can see through to your base layers.
step 2: Locate your ski pole with duct tape wrapped around it (it not only helps in situations like this, but it also acts as a secondary handle for traverses!)

step 3: Apply duct tape to vent hole and apply pressure. Best done on a flat surface, or with the fabric tight. Make sure to allow for bends, like elbows and knees!

step 4: Get back to riding!

This is a great easy repair while you are out in the backcountry. When you get back, you have a couple of options, like using a full patch, seam sealer, thread & needle, etc.  I will show off some of those as well in a little bit!

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Posted: 11 September 2012 06:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Duct tape also gets the job done when your skin glue isn’t holding (along with voile straps). I always carry some on my poles and it certainly useful.

What are some other gear repair tips for something like bindings? I seem to only manage to break those in the back country. Do you have any repair tips other than to carry spare parts?

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Posted: 12 September 2012 10:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Finn, what type of bindings are you breaking?

Bindings are hard to fix in the BC. I normally have a couple of feet of bailing wire, and a few extra binding screws in my pack just in case.  I have made make-shift tele bindings out of bailing wire and duct tape.  I have also held some AT bindings together (when the heel piece blew off) with bailing wire around the heel.

I have been keeping my eyes out for some small tubes of 5 minute epoxy as well, as I feel like that would be good for repairs.

As far as blown out screws in the backcountry, it is tough to replace screws when you don’t have a drill. if you can fill the holes with something, to get a bit of grip, you might be able to work your way out.  Power bars work well for this… you can chew it up, put it in the hole, and then put the screw in. Then you tape the binding back down to the ski and don’t put too much pressure on it.

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Posted: 17 November 2012 05:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Since it is the start of the season, I figured I would show you how to actually fix the gear so you can remove the duct tape.

1): remove the jacket from your body.
2) wash the jacket (you might want to put a piece of tape on the backside of the hole)
3) remove duct tape from hole.
4) tape hole from back side using masking tape or K-Tape. This will help keep the seam nice and neat, so you can clean it up.
 
5) Locate hole from back side and gently press the tear onto the tape so it is flat. Clean up any stray threads or strands, so they don’t get in the way:

6) Bust out the Sil-Net silicone repiar. It is a plyable silicone, that comes in a tube at the local hardware store or gear shop. Buy the smallest tube possible.  Put the tip of the tube over the two sides of the flapping tear and spread the silicone.

7) use a tiny little brush to spread it out nice and thin, and to make sure that it gets good coverage.

8) store out of the way and let the silicone dry for about 24 hours until fully cured. 

9) remove the tape from the inside and check to make sure that the tear is still not there.
10) Go ski.

This works on jackets, pants, gaiters, gloves gauntlets, gloves, etc.  Sometimes you may actually have to cut the inside of the liner of the jacket to get to the outer layer. if this is the case, just put a couple of stitches in the inner liner, as it is most likely not waterproof.

Some people have sewn the hole first, and then seam sealed, which is a good way to do it, but generally could be considered a little bit overkill.

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Posted: 26 September 2013 04:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Just another fun tidbit related to this. When you blow out your zipper, you can get a couple of ski straps and strap them around your chest. If you have 2 chest pockets, you can put them between the 2 zippers.

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