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Backcountry Coalition
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How to plan a backcountry trip!
Posted: 07 April 2010 11:17 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Here is a link for the article, which is copied below.  It is about planning for a backcountry ski trip, and how to make sure that you have it organzied!  As with every trip, there will be some modifications, but it is a god place to start.  http://www.ehow.com/how_136144_organize-backcountry-ski.html

After years of listening to your ravings about great snow and scenery, your friends have finally agreed to accompany you on a backcountry ski tour. They’ll thank you for introducing them to the vast ski experiences beyond the chairlifts and crowds—but only if the trip is fun, comfortable and safe.

Instructions:
Step 1: Know everyone’s skiing ability. When you ski in a group, you must stay on terrain that the least capable skier can handle. Unless your group is fairly large and includes several experienced skiers, breaking into smaller groups along the way is probably not a wise option.

Step 2: Pick a destination. An ideal trip includes beautiful scenery, a pleasant lunch spot and a variety of terrain. If good weather seems likely, open areas with lots of sun are great. If the weather is likely to be stormy, choose a route with some tree coverage.

Step 3: Research your destination carefully. Many outdoor stores have computerized topographical map displays that let you print a map of exactly the spot you’re interested in. Be sure you understand how to read topographical depictions of terrain. Check out guidebooks that cover popular areas and include maps as well as written descriptions of quality ski spots.

Step 4: Question members of the group beforehand about their familiarity with the basics of backcountry skiing. In addition to their ski gear, everyone in the group will need climbing skins, food, water and proper clothing. It’s a good idea for each person to carry a headlamp, whistle, map, compass, GPS device, knife, first aid kit, matches and duct tape. If you take along beginners, you will need to check their gear, spend time showing them how to use it, and adjust your schedule and expectations accordingly.

Step 5: Understand the route’s avalanche risk. Safe travel in avalanche areas requires each member of the group to have a shovel, an avalanche probe and an avalanche beacon. Using this equipment effectively cannot be learned on the spot; repeated practice is essential. Evaluating terrain and snow conditions for avalanche risk also requires training. Many universities and outdoor stores in avalanche-prone regions offer training in avalanche safety.

Step 6: Leave clear notice with a responsible person about your destination and expected return time. Instruct this person to notify authorities if you don’t return by a given time. Know when the sun sets, and plan a turnaround time accordingly.

Step 7: Check weather reports before you go. If things don’t look good, consider postponing the trip.

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Posted: 12 April 2010 06:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I cant wait for next winter!

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Posted: 22 December 2010 02:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
mostly lurking
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who keeps posting under my name? wink

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Posted: 22 August 2011 11:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Is there a good way to get early-season avalanche training?  I thought I saw FOBP training for mid-season, but I’d like to get a jump on it.

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Posted: 15 September 2011 11:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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FOBP is doing some classes at Winter Park in december, but before that there is not really a ton around for on-snow stuff, especially around Colorado.

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Posted: 01 November 2013 09:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
drinking beer in the lot
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here is a little video from Dynafit talking about decision making and how we human tend to influence it .... go or bad.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eOFldor5pBs

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